Facilities

 

Ceol na Mara has a double bedroom, a twin bedroom, a combined kitchen and dining room, a living room and a shower room. The main rooms all look out to sea.

Wireless broadband is available—or at least as broad as it gets out here. Mobile coverage here ranges from rare to non-existent; if you want to keep in touch while you’re here, there’s a payphone (see below), or you can use online messaging (WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Skype, etc.)—but bear in mind that the limited speed of the broadband makes online voice calls unreliable and video calls very testing. Online text messaging works beautifully.

The bedrooms each have an LCD TV with integrated DVD player, ample storage space, and a washbasin with mirror. The double bedroom has a dressing table that can easily be used as a desk. Bed linen and towels are included in the price, as is central heating. The beds have ‘all seasons’ duvets—a thin and a thick duvet joined together—to offer flexibility.

(Click on pictures to enlarge.)

The kitchen has what you’d expect—oven, hob, dishwasher, washer-dryer, microwave, fridge-freezer, kettle, toaster and so on—and an extensive range of cookware, crockery and utensils. There’s a dining table that seats four, a combined CD player and radio.

The living room has another LCD TV with integrated DVD and a payphone. There’s a growing library of books and DVDs, and more are always welcome—see the Library page for details.

Accessibility

Unfortunately Ceol na Mara was not designed with people with limited mobility in mind. While everything is on the ground floor, access to the chalet is up three steps, doors are standard domestic width (approximately 700mm), and the shower room does not have enough space to enter with a wheelchair and then close the door. If you’d like any more information, please contact us.

Green credentials

Inevitably, a timber chalet, built before climate change was anything like the priority it is today, in an exposed location in the Highlands of Scotland, isn’t going to be the greenest building around. However, in the time that we’ve owned it, we’ve made several improvements in order to reduce its impact on the environment:

  • The central heating is powered by an air source heat pump. This system uses up to 6 kilowatts of electricity but produces up to 16 kilowatts of heat—the other 10 kW coming from the heat in the atmosphere. This system has replaced the property’s ageing oil boiler.
  • The electricity for the chalet (and for the heat pump) is supplied on a tariff where every unit used is matched by a unit produced entirely from renewables.
  • The chalet is now double glazed throughout.
  • We have upgraded the lighting; where possible and appropriate, we’ve fitted energy efficient lamps. Where not we’ve installed dimmer switches.

We’ve got other improvements planned, including solar PV to generate electricity.